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Graphene News — Electronics

Conformal transfer of graphene for reproducible device fabrication

Marko Spasenovic

Conformal transfer of graphene on a prepatterned substrate is a viable technology for reproducible fabrication of graphene devices. Such is the conclusion of a recent study by a team of scientists from Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Saudi Arabia.Reliable fabrication of graphene devices for electronics has been a technological challenge...

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Graphene for interconnects

Marko Spasenovic

Graphene, boasting large carrier mobility and thermal conductivity, coupled with small material volume, emerges as a viable alternative to copper interconnects in electronic circuits.   Copper was an optimal material for interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs) throughout most of 20th century IC history, which was only natural following the great...

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What do rabbits with LEDs in their contact lenses and low-cost fuel cells have in common?

Marko Spasenovic

The diverse beauty of graphene is coming to light through advanced applications as varied as fuel cells and light-emitting contact lenses. Researchers from Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology (UNIST) in Korea feature in both these recent achievements which caused much excitement in the graphene community. Graphene has been...

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What Kind Of Graphene For Which Application?

Jean-Christophe Lavocat

The development of graphene has a very high pace. The production of graphene is made in different ways, for instance by chemical vapor deposition or by growth on Si, and the applications and quality vary a lot. In this blog post we will try to help you deciding which kind...

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A bandgap semiconductor nanostructure made entirely from graphene

Jean-Christophe Lavocat

In 2005, when Andre Geim and Philip Kim separately worked on graphene's electrons and showed that the material was showing a zero-bandgap, this came as a very curious feature that people would probably use. This zero-bandgap property makes that graphene is not a real semi-conductor and could not be used directly by the industry. Many successful attempts were made to create a band gap in graphene, by using doped graphene, nanoribbons or by using an electric field between a bi-layered graphene.

Few would have thought about bending graphene to get a band gap. However, this idea has been followed by Edward Conrad since three years now in Georgia Tech. He has been working on graphene grown on surfaces with small grooves (18 nanometers deep). When graphene is deposited over these trenches a semiconducting behavior appears.  The results were published this month in the journal Nature physics and show a 0.5 electonvolts band gap.

We asked Edward Conrad some questions about his last publication .... 

Source : Hicks, J., Tejeda, A., Taleb-Ibrahimi, A., Nevius, M., Wang, F., Shepperd, K., Palmer, J., Bertran, F., Le Fèvre, P., Kunc, J., de Heer, W., Berger, C., & Conrad, E. (2012). A wide-bandgap metal–semiconductor–metal nanostructure made entirely from graphene Nature Physics DOI: 10.1038/nphys2487

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